Keep On Running

Sometimes the best part of a story is in the name. Take for example the word for an activity that is literally running rampant on this post-Thanksgiving “cool-down” day.

While the act of running as a means of training for skilled athletes dates back to at least the ancient Greeks and their Olympics, the general notion of physical fitness has its origins in Medieval Europe. This was a time when swordsmanship was highly esteemed, both as a means of self-defense and a measure of social standing.  But swordsmanship requires stamina, and it was well understood that strength and endurance could be developed by lifting weights and, although it wouldn’t be called “jogging” for another half-a-millenium, regularly running at a measured pace.

Somewhere in the 16th Century the word “jog” first came into usage as in “to shake, jolt or move with a jerk” (hence “jog your memory”) and it would also eventually pertain to the activity involved in keeping a horse in condition. By the 19th Century (in Britain but not the United States) “jogging” would also refer to a full training regimen for soldiers and athletes.

As for “joggers” as we know them,  i.e. those who leisurely trot for health, pleasure and to work off the previous day’s excesses, we can thank the Kiwis. Formed in 1962, for athletic enthusiasts (those accustomed to a fitness training regimen in the British sense) who would meet specifically to run “for fitness and sociability,” the Auckland Joggers Club is believed to have been the first to use “jogger” as a noun.  When University of Oregon track coach (and Nike shoe designer), Bill Bowerman came for a visit he was so taken with the concept that he borrowed the name and wrote the book that is now credited for igniting the running revolution, “Jogging” in 1966.

Coincidentally that was the very year that today’s selection was a Number 1 hit in the UK for a group whose name also comes with an interesting story. Formed in Birmingham when, in 1963, Welsh guitarist Spencer Davis recruited organist Steve Winwood and his bass playing brother Muff, along with Pete York on drums, the band was originally called the Rhythm and Blues Quartette.

Asked to change their name after signing a recording contract the following year Muff Winwood later commented, “Spencer was the only one who enjoyed doing interviews, so I pointed out that if we called it The Spencer Davis Group, the rest of us could stay in bed and let him do them.”

Although “his” group would disband not long after Steve Winwood left to form Traffic, the wide-awake Spencer Davis had plenty of interview opportunities in the mean time, with such international hits as “Gimme Some Lovin”, “I’m a Man” and … (written by Jamaican-born singer Jackie Edwards)  “Keep On Running”

LISTEN TO TODAY’S SELECTION – Friday 23 November 

Keep On Running

 Keep on running

Keep on hiding

One fine day I’m gonna’ be the one

To make you understand

Oh yeah

I’m gonna be your man

Keep on running

Running from my arms

One fine day I’m gonna be the one

To make you understand

Oh yeah

I’m gonna be your man

 Hey, Hey, Hey

Everyone is talking about me

It makes me feels so bad

Hey, Hey, Hey

Everyone is laughing at me

It makes me feel so sad

So keep on running

Hey, Hey, Hey

All right

Hey hey hey…

Keep on running

Running from my arms

One fine day I’m gonna be the one

To make you understand

Oh yeah

I’m gonna be your man

Hey, Hey, Hey

Everyone is talking about me

It makes me feels so sad

Hey, Hey, Hey

Everyone is laughing at me

It makes me feel so bad

Keep on running

Running from my arms

One fine day I’m gonna be the one

To make you understand

Oh yeah

I’m gonna be your man

Make me feel so good

I wanna be your man

All right

Come on baby

I wanna be your man

You know you make feel so good

Hey, Hey, Hey…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s