…It’s Friday…I’m in love…

Mr. Smith cites the Beatles as an influence, but then so does nearly everyone who has written a popular song within the last 50 years. Nick Drake is also near the top of the list …that’s interesting.

Other influences? Jimi Hendrix, Thin Lizzy, Buzzcocks and Joy Division.  Perhaps you think you know where this is going, especially when he throws in Ziggy Stardust himself, David Bowie and Syd Barrett of Pink Floyd who…“shine on you crazy diamond”…succumbed to psychedelics and mental illness early on.

But then he rounds out his list with the doo-wopping (pre-War) Ink Spots and the Country n’ Gospel Statler Brothers.  So what musical genre do you suppose our Mr. Smith is best known for?  Would you believe Goth Rock?

Born in Blackpool in 1959, Robert James Smith has served as lead singer, guitar player, principal songwriter and sole constant for The Cure since it’s formation in West Sussex in 1976.  That was a time when he also (concurrently and energetically) played his flanging guitar for the punk/post-punk Siouxsie and the Banshees.

Still touring with The Cure to this day and (at age 53) still sporting the trademark “look” that he pioneered, with black eyeliner, teased hair, black clothes, pale skin and smudged red lipstick, Robert Smith has shepherded his band through the post-Punk and New Wave eras of the late ‘70s and early ‘80s, and has held a lantern through the valley of the dark and tormented Goth scene, prior to helping The Cure to find a slightly more upbeat sound as an Alternative Rock Band with songs like “Lovesong”, “Just Like Heaven” and today’s approbation of one of the finest days of the week.

Surely the journey has been worth it as the group has sold nearly 30 million copies of their releases, including thirteen studio albums, ten EPs and more than 20 singles, of which “Friday I’m in Love” tops the list, peaking at Number 18 on the Billboard Charts and Number 6 on the UK Chart in 1992.

Having written the song, Smith was convinced that he had inadvertently stolen the chord progression from somewhere else, very much echoing what happened when Paul McCartney first came up with “Yesterday”.  And like McCartney, Smith grew downright paranoid, asking all and sundry if they had ever played or even heard the song before.  Happily in both cases no one had, and in both cases the mysterious melody became (arguably) the artist’s best song.

LISTEN TO TODAY’S SELECTION – Friday 11 May

Friday I’m in Love

 I don’t care if Monday’s blue

Tuesday’s gray and Wednesday too

Thursday I don’t care about you

It’s Friday, I’m in love

 Monday you can fall apart

Tuesday, Wednesday break my heart

Oh, Thursday doesn’t even start

It’s Friday I’m in love

 Saturday, wait

And Sunday always comes too late

But Friday, never hesitate…

 I don’t care if Mondays black

Tuesday, Wednesday – heart attack

Thursday, never looking back

It’s Friday, I’m in love

Monday, you can hold your head

Tuesday, Wednesday stay in bed

Or Thursday – watch the walls instead

It’s Friday, I’m in love

Saturday, wait

And Sunday always comes too late

But Friday, never hesitate…

Dressed up to the eyes

It’s a wonderful surprise

To see your shoes and your spirits rise

Throwing out your frown

And just smiling at the sound

And as sleek as a sheik

Spinning round and round

Always take a big bite

It’s such a gorgeous sight

To see you eat in the middle of the night

You can never get enough

Enough of this stuff

It’s Friday, I’m in love

 I don’t care if Monday’s blue

Tuesday’s gray and Wednesday too

Thursday I don’t care about you

It’s Friday, I’m in love

 Monday you can fall apart

Tuesday, Wednesday break my heart

Thursday doesn’t even start

It’s Friday I’m in love

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