Who wouldn’t go?

Popularly recorded by generations of singers, it’s a song that became internationally recognized in 1952 as the last in a series of instant holiday classics performed by singing cowboy, Gene Autry, which included “Here Comes Santa Claus” in 1947, “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer” in 1949, and both “Frosty the Snow Man” and “Peter Cottontail” in 1950.

But “Up on the Housetop” (aka “Up on the Rooftop”) was actually published in 1864, technically making it the first-ever secular Christmas carol – although “Jingle Bells” was published in 1857, it was originally intended as a song to celebrate Thanksgiving.  Written by Benjamin Russell Hanby of New Paris, Ohio it is also the first to feature jolly St. Nick.

Actually a melding of the British “Father Christmas” and the Dutch “Sinterklass”, our image of Santa Claus (the Americanized name dates back to 1773) has much of its basis in the 1823 poem “A Visit From St. Nicholas” (aka “The Night Before Christmas”) by Clement Clarke Moore, in addition to the iconic depiction drawn by illustrator Thomas Nast.

As for the 17th Century origins of Father Christmas and Sinterklass, they’re believed to have roots in both Germanic pagan tradition (where Odin would descend one’s chimney during the winter solstice) and in the 4th Century Greek-born Nikolaos of Myra.  Also referred to as Nikolaos the Wonderworker, the (now) multi-denominational “Saint Nicholas” was revered for easing the plight of impoverished children and wrongly condemned prisoners and is still commonly recognized in port cities everywhere as patron saint of sailors and ships, offering safe voyage and protection from storms at sea.

Which may seem to be a long way from the Central Till Plains Region of Indianapolis, Indiana, where this short track was included on the 2007 album, “Jingle Sax” by the Indianapolis Sax Quartet… but then again (“click, click, click”) one mustn’t forget the old boy’s alternative method of getting around…

 LISTEN TO TODAY’S SELECTION – Wednesday 19 December

Up On The Housetop

 Up on the housetop

Reindeer pause

Out jumps good old Santa Claus.

Down thru’ the chimney

With lots of toys

All for the little ones

Christmas joys

Ho, ho, ho!

Who wouldn’t go!

Ho, ho, ho!

Who wouldn’t go!

Up on the housetop

Click, click, click,

Down thru’ the chimney

With good Saint Nick

 First comes the stocking

Of little Nell

Oh, dear Santa

Fill it well

Give her a dolly

That laughs and cries

One that will open

And shut her eyes

Ho, ho, ho!

Who wouldn’t go!

Ho, ho, ho!

Who wouldn’t go!

Up on the housetop

Click, click, click

Down thru’ the chimney

With good Saint Nick

 Next comes the stocking

Of little Will

Oh just see

What a glorious fill

Here is a hammer

And lots of tacks

Also a ball

And a whip that cracks

Ho, ho, ho!

Who wouldn’t go!

Ho, ho, ho!

Who wouldn’t go!

Up on the housetop

Click, click, click

Down thru’ the chimney

With good Saint Nick

Deer might fly, why not? I met you.

The pheromones were surely swirling, the neurons tap-tap-tapping for indie folk singers, Deb Talan and Steve Tannen on that illustrious evening in Harvard Square.  Each had a thriving career as an independent singer-songwriter-performer and although they’d never met, each was a huge fan of the other’s music.

Tannen, from New York City, later claimed to have played Talan’s solo album “constantly,” even singing along in harmony, while Talan, from Pelham, Mass (which borders Amherst) maintained that she was so captivated by Tannen’s music that she had “formed a kind of a relationship” with it. Then in 2001, Talan attended one of Tannen’s shows at Club Passim in Harvard Square and not only did they quickly become musical collaborators, they fell in love.

Now a married couple with two children, they regularly tour as a duo, calling themselves The Weepies.  According to Deb Talan it’s a name that was inspired by “…those old movies that were called weepies, where…if you needed a good cry, you could go and see one and bring your hanky and have a good time. And we want to provide that for people. We want to make music that touches them and moves them in that way, the place where tears come from, for joy and for sorrow.”

This seasonal song comes from their first album together, released independently (appropriately enough) at Club Passim in 2003.  Entitled “Happiness” the album was written and recorded in three weeks “in the white heat of their artistic and personal connection,” noted one reviewer, and though The Weepies wouldn’t land a record deal for another two years it sold more than 10,000 copies.

LISTEN TO TODAY’S SELECTION – Tuesday 18 December 

All That I Want

 Out in the harbor

The ships come in, it’s Christmastime

The kids all holler carols ‘cross the water

Stars that shine

 All that I want, all that I want

Above the rooftops

The full moon dips its golden spoon

I wait on clip-clops, deer might fly

Why not? I met you

 All that I want, all that I want

 And when the night is falling

Down the sky at midnight

Another year is stalling

Far away a good bye, good night

All that I want, all that I want, all that I want

So small a turning

The world grows older every day

An ache, a yearning

Soften when I hear you say

 All that I want, all that I want

 And when the cold wind’s blowing

Snow drifts through the pine trees

In houses lights are glowing

Likewise in your eyes that find me here

With all that I want

 Out in the harbor

The ships come in, it’s Christmastime

It’s Christmastime

It’s Christmastime

 

 

 

I would teach my feet to fly

Referring to the record years later she said, “there’s hardly a dishonest note in the vocals. At that period of my life, I had no personal defenses. I felt like a cellophane wrapper on a pack of cigarettes. I felt like I had absolutely no secrets from the world and I couldn’t pretend in my life to be strong. Or to be happy. But the advantage of it in the music was that there were no defenses there either.”

Despite the success of her first three albums the onset of 1971 was apparently a rough time for Joni Mitchell, who had just gone through a bumpy breakup with her longtime companion, Graham Nash. So she stopped performing, left California and decided to travel around Europe.  Somewhere along the way she began to write about her feelings and much of it ended up on album number four.

Released later that year, “Blue” was hugely successful, hitting Number 20 of the Billboard Album Charts and Number 3 in the UK, all of which inspired her to return to live performing.  As David Crosby later said, “By the time she did “Blue” she was past me (as a songwriter and musician) and rushing toward the horizon”

Although never released as a single, this, the album’s eighth track, is the third-most widely covered of any Joni Mitchell song after “Both Sides Now” and “Big Yellow Taxi”.

 LISTEN TO TODAY’S SELECTION – Monday 17 December 

River

 It’s coming on Christmas

They’re cutting down trees

They’re putting up reindeer

And singing songs of joy and peace

Oh I wish I had a river I could skate away on

 But it don’t snow here

It stays pretty green

I’m going to make a lot of money

Then I’m going to quit this crazy scene

Oh I wish I had a river I could skate away on

 I wish I had a river so long

I would teach my feet to fly

I wish I had a river I could skate away on

I made my baby cry

 He tried hard to help me

You know, he put me at ease

And he loved me so naughty

Made me weak in the knees

Oh, I wish I had a river I could skate away on

I’m so hard to handle

I’m selfish and I’m sad

Now I’ve gone and lost the best baby

That I ever had

I wish I had a river I could skate away on

 Oh, I wish I had a river so long

I would teach my feet to fly

I wish I had a river

I could skate away on

I made my baby say goodbye

 It’s coming on Christmas

They’re cutting down trees

They’re putting up reindeer

And singing songs of joy and peace

I wish I had a river I could skate away on

Though our hearts be wrapped in sorrow, from the hope of dawn we borrow, promise of a glad tomorrow…

I live near Emerson Field here in Concord.  It’s a lovely common area surrounded by pretty houses and it features an enormous flagpole that is lit at night.  Last evening was incredibly somber because though the Christmas lights were merrily shining from all the houses, the flag at the very center was at half-mast.

The grief in Newtown must be unimaginable and the initial reaction of every parent among us was surely to hold our little ones close, regardless of their age.  But the human heart is awesomely commodious and (especially in this season) “though our hearts be wrapped in sorrow” there’s always room for a little comfort and just a touch of joy.

“Ar Hyd y Nos” (All Through the Night) is a Welsh folksong sung to an old tune that was first published in 1784 by Edward Jones’ in his “Musical and Poetical Relics of the Welsh Bards” with lyrics written (in Welsh) by John Ceiriog Hughes.  Since translated into many languages there are numerous versions, including the relevant one below.

“The Wassail Song” (with selected verses here) is a traditional English Christmas carol, circa 1850, and refers to the 19th Century practice of ‘wassailing’, where groups of orphans or vagabonds would dance their way through the wintry streets and offer to sing good cheer if a householder would give them a drink from his wassail bowl or even allow them to stand beside the warmth of his hearth for a few moments. The wassail bowl itself contained a hearty combination of hot ale, apples, spices and mead… “just alcoholic enough to warm tingling toes and fingers of the singers”

This short medley is found on Yo Yo Ma’s sublime 2008 album, “Songs of Joy & Peace”

 LISTEN TO THIS EARLY SELECTION – Sunday 15 December

The Wassail Song

 Here we come a-wassailing

Among the leaves so green

Here we come a-wand’ring

So fair to be seen

 Love and joy come to you

And to you your wassail too

And God bless you and send you

A Happy New Year

And God send you a Happy New Year

We are not daily beggars

That beg from door to door

But we are neighbours’ children

Whom you have seen before

 Love and joy come to you…

God bless the master of this house

Likewise the mistress too

And all the little children

That round the tables go

 Love and joy come to you…

 Good master and good mistress

While you’re sitting by the fire

Pray think of us poor children

Who are wandering in the mire

Love and joy come to you…

 

All Through the Night

 Deep the silence ’round us spreading

All through the night

Dark the path that we are treading

All through the night

Still the coming day discerning

By the hope within us burning

To the dawn our footsteps turning

All through the night

 Star of faith the dark adorning

All through the night

Leads us fearless towards the morning

All through the night

Though our hearts be wrapped in sorrow

From the hope of dawn we borrow

Promise of a glad tomorrow

All through the night

 

Because it does what you want it to do

It only makes sense that her third album would have the rather drawn-out title, “Academy Award Performance: And the Envelope, Please”

After all, Maureen McGovern’s first album, “The Morning After” featured her 1972 Oscar-winning recording (ah yes) “The Morning After” from “The Poseidon Adventure.” And her second album, “Nice to Be Around” featured her 1973 Oscar-nominated recording (can you guess?) “Nice to Be Around” from “Cinderella Liberty”.  Clearly it was time to change things up a bit, even though this third album featured her 1974 Oscar-winning recording, “We May Never Love Like This Again” from “The Towering Inferno”.

Nice niche if you can get it.  The remaining tracks were covers of other Oscar-winning songs including today’s selection from the 1934 Fred Astaire/Ginger Rogers film, “The Gay Divorcee” which was adapted from the Broadway musical, “Gay Divorce” also starring Astaire. The Hays Office is responsible for the name change because, while a divorcee can be gay (and why not in every sense), it would be “unseemly” to have people thinking of divorce itself as being a lighthearted endeavor.

Although the screenplay followed the stage version’s plot line most of Cole Porter’s musical numbers (except for “Night and Day”) weren’t included.  Yet it seems to have been the right decision, as this number, written by Con Conrad with lyrics by Herb Magidson, won the first-ever Academy Award for Best Original Song.

McGovern’s subsequent cover version proved to be her only hit on the UK Singles Chart, peaking at Number 16. Unfortunately her musical finesse didn’t extend to talent management. Not only did her manager receive an outrageous 40 percent commission and grossly overpay her musicians, he also allowed her contract with 20th Century Fox to expire, leaving her in financial straits and forcing her to quit the business.

Eventually she would return to the lime light with better management – first with select performances, then with another Top 20 hit (this time for the theme song to the sitcom, “Angie”) and then with a successful career on Broadway – but in 1976 the two-time Oscar winner was reduced to taking a secretarial job under the assumed name, Glenda Schwartz…  Well slip me a slug o’ that wonderful Krug. Let’s hear it for second acts..!

LISTEN TO TODAY’S SELECTION – Saturday 15 December 

The Continental

 Beautiful music

Dangerous rhythm

 It’s something daring, the Continental

A way of dancing that’s really ultra new

It’s very subtle, the Continental

Because it does what you want it to do

 It has a passion, the Continental

An invitation to moonlight and romance

It’s quite the fashion, the Continental

Because you tell of your love while you dance

 Your lips whisper so tenderly

His eyes answer your song

 Two bodies swaying, the Continental

And you are saying just what you’re thinking of

So, keep on dancing the Continental

For it’s a song of romance and of love

 You kiss while you’re dancing

It’s continental, oh oh oh, it’s continental

You sing while you’re dancing

Your voice is gentle, oh oh oh, and sentimental

 You’ll know before the dance is through

That you’re in love with him and

He’s in love with you

 You’ll find while you’re dancing

That there’s a rhythm in your heart and soul,

A certain rhythm that you can’t control

And you will do the Continental all the time

Beautiful music

Dangerous rhythm

Beautiful music

Dangerous rhythm

The Continental

Time is Tight

So which is it?  A “fourth dimension” that is independent of events but in which events occur in sequence, or simply part of a fundamental intellectual structure in which we sequence and compare events?

When I’m feeling adventurous I hold with the former (hey, if it was good enough for Newton it’s good enough for….), but since I perennially (sic) seem to be running behind it, and often find myself wishing for more of it, I’m far from an authority. Still, I do happen to agree with the incisive Ambrose Bierce, whose take on time can be found in his definition of the word, “day” (à la the “The Devil’s Dictionary”): “Day n. A period of twenty-four hours, mostly misspent.”

Time is tight and with Christmas Eve swiftly sneaking up on us, it’s feeling tighter all the time.  Back to Booker T & the M.G.’s (you may recall “Green Onions”) who were primetime by the summer of ’67 after backing Otis Redding at Monterey Pop.  They were all set to take Woodstock by storm as well, but drummer Al Jackson, Jr. didn’t want to ride in the helicopter that would get them to the stage…so they didn’t play.

All of which made little difference to the Beatles, who always seemed to be at the vortex of musical trends and had limousines sent to the airport to collect them when they arrived in London for their “Hit the Road, Stax!” tour later that summer. John Lennon was quoted as saying that he’d always wanted to write an instrumental for Booker T. and the M. G.’s, or as he laughingly referred to them, “Book a Table and the Maître D’s.”

The following year the group recorded a soundtrack album for “Up Tight,” a now forgotten remake of John Ford’s film, “The Informer” which moved the setting from 1922 Dublin to contemporary Cleveland. Perhaps like me you’re unable to place the movie, but you’ll no doubt recall this track from the album, which reached Number 6 (their second biggest hit) on the Billboard Charts in 1969.  Sometimes “Time is tight” in a very good way.

LISTEN TO TODAY’S SELECTION – Friday 14 December  

You can’t keep a good cheerleader down.

Born in Philadelphia in 1943, Antonia Christina Basilotta was relocated with her family while her father conducted orchestras in Chicago and Las Vegas, where (significantly) she was a cheerleader at Las Vegas High School. After graduation, and with the adopted stage name, Toni Basil, she made the short leap to L.A., in hopes of becoming a choreographer.

Having danced professionally as a child, Basil managed to land a dancing gig during the first season of Shindig! in 1964 and quickly worked her way up to assistant choreographer.  From there she ventured into film work, both as an actor (with minor roles in Sweet Charity, Easy Rider, Myra Breckinridge, Five Easy Pieces, The Last Movie and (ouch) Mother, Jugs & Speed) and more importantly as a choreographer in the T.A.M.I. Show and that wonderfully adventurous psychedelic comedy (featuring the brazenly out-of-character Monkees) Head.

All of which led to choreographing more mainstream films like: American Graffiti, The Rose, Peggy Sue Got Married, My Best Friend’s Wedding, Legally Blond and Charlie Wilson’s War … and to (brilliantly) choreographing such music videos as Talking Heads’ “Once in a Lifetime” and the one that accompanies today’s selection.

Unsurprisingly Basil also sang, mainly for film scores, although she was also a featured solo artist singing  “Wham Rebop Boom Bam” (remember it?) on the first season of Saturday Night Live (me neither).  Still, she is easily best known for a single that was written by Mike Chapman and Nicky Chinn and initially entitled “Kitty” when it was performed by the British group, Racey in 1979

Basil proceed to change the song’s title to “Mickey” to make it about a man, and though her version was recorded in 1980 her label didn’t actually issue it until 1982, when it  quickly knocked Lionel Richie from the top of the Billboard Charts (another reason to like it) and reached the Number Two spot in the UK.

LISTEN TO TODAY’S SELECTION – Thursday 13 December

After making her recording Basil went on to conceive, direct and choreograph her famous video, wearing a head cheerleader uniform from her alma mater, Las Vegas High School.  Although it is now remembered as one of the most popular videos on early MTV perhaps the most amazing detail about its production is that like the song itself, it was first released (in the UK) in 1980 … nearly a year before MTV’s inception in 1981.

 Oh Mickey, you’re so fine you’re so fine you blow my mind,

Hey Mickey, Hey Mickey,

Oh Mickey, you’re so fine you’re so fine you blow my mind,

Hey Mickey, Hey Mickey,

Oh Mickey, you’re so fine you’re so fine you blow my mind,

Hey Mickey, Hey Mickey,

Oh Mickey, you’re so fine you’re so fine you blow my mind,

Hey Mickey, Hey Mickey,

 Hey Mickey!

You’ve been around all night and that’s a little long

You think you’ve got the right, but I think you’ve got it wrong

Why can’t you say goodnight so you can take me home, Mickey

 ‘Cause when you say you will, it always means you won’t

You’re givin’ me the chills, baby, please baby don’t

Every night you still leave me all alone, Mickey

 Oh Mickey, what a pity you don’t understand

You take me by the heart when you take me by the hand

Oh Mickey, you’re so pretty, can’t you understand

It’s guys like you Mickey

Oh, what you do Mickey, do Mickey

Don’t break my heart, Mickey

 Hey Mickey!

Now when you take me by the hooves, everyone’s gonna know

Every time you move I let a little more show

There’s somethin’ we can use, so don’t say no, Mickey

 So come on and give it to me any way you can

Any way you wanna’ do it, I’ll treat you like a man

Oh please, baby, please, don’t leave me in a jam, Mickey

 Oh Mickey, what a pity you don’t understand

You take me by the heart when you take me by the hand

Oh Mickey, you’re so pretty, can’t you understand

It’s guys like you Mickey

Oh, what you do Mickey, do Mickey

Don’t break my heart, Mickey

 Oh Mickey, you’re so fine you’re so fine you blow my mind,

Hey Mickey, Hey Mickey,

Oh Mickey, you’re so fine you’re so fine you blow my mind,

Hey Mickey, Hey Mickey,

Oh Mickey, you’re so fine you’re so fine you blow my mind,

Hey Mickey, Hey Mickey,

 Oh Mickey, what a pity you don’t understand

You take me by the heart when you take me by the hand

Oh Mickey, you’re so pretty, can’t you understand

It’s guys like you Mickey

Oh, what you do Mickey, do Mickey

Don’t break my heart, Mickey

 Oh Mickey, what a pity you don’t understand

You take me by the heart when you take me by the hand

Oh Mickey, you’re so pretty, can’t you understand

It’s guys like you Mickey (Mickey)

Oh, what you do Mickey, do Mickey

Don’t break my heart, Mickey

 Oh Mickey, what a pity you don’t understand

You take me by the heart when you take me by the hand

Oh Mickey, you’re so pretty, can’t you understand

It’s guys like you Mickey

Oh, what you do Mickey, do Mickey

Don’t break my heart, Mickey

But you can’t come back and be the first in line

It was half a century ago this year that Brian Jones had to come up with a name for his band while on the phone with Jazz News. Asked the obvious question he responded after noticing a Muddy Waters record on the floor, which had “Rollin’ Stone” as one of the tracks.  Later, when they played their first gig, they were billed as “the Rollin’ Stones.”

By the following year, with a new manager and a properly spelled name, the Rolling Stones had landed a sweet deal with Decca Records, which had regrettably passed on the Beatles and was happy to go along with positioning this capable new group as the anti-Beatles. But suddenly they were expected to record their own material and there’s a learning curve to songwriting.  Their initial song-list mainly consisted of R&B covers and it wasn’t until the release of their fourth studio LP, “Aftermath” in 1966, that the Rolling Stones finally had an entire album of original tracks, each written by the burgeoning songwriting team of Jagger/Richards.

Recorded entirely in the US, at RCA Studios in Hollywood, and fully released in stereo (two Rolling Stones firsts) “Aftermath” was also noteworthy for the brilliant/tragic Brian Jones’ musical experimentation, including sitar, marimba and dulcimer.  But as it was then common practice to release different versions of an album in the UK and the US, today’s selection received little recognition on this side of the Atlantic.

Songs that had already been released as singles weren’t usually included on British pop albums, but British records still tended to be longer-playing than their American counterparts because 13 or 14 tracks was the standard length, as opposed to the 11 or 12 tracks included on an American LP.   Take “Aftermath” for example, which quickly topped the UK charts, released in April 1966 with 14 tracks, it didn’t include the Stones’ hit singles, “Paint It, Black” and “19th Nervous Breakdown.”

Released a few months later with only 12 tracks, the American version (which peaked at Number 2) did include “Paint It, Black” but excluded “Mother’s Little Helper”Take it or Leave It”  “What to Do” and “Out of Time”.  While “Mother’s Little Helper” was also released as a single (peaking at Number 8 on the Billboard Charts), it and the other eliminated tracks were later included on that tried-and-true concept, the American-only compilation album.

Released in 1967, “Flowers” featured tracks (some dating back to 1965) that had either been released as UK singles or had been omitted on the American versions of “Aftermath” and it’s follow-up album “Between the Buttons”.  Smart marketing perhaps, as “Flowers” reached Number 3 on the Billboard Album charts in 1967…but if you happen to enjoy what Brian Jones did on marimba with this song, it was rather a gyp.  While the original version ran for 5:37 (as it does here), the American version was abridged to 3:29.

At least that Summer of Love was a turning point for the custom of releasing differing US/UK versions of an album. Like most British Invasion groups, Beatles albums had also been produced and marketed this way.  But in 1967, with the game changing “concept” release of “Sgt. Pepper” the practice had…well…begun to run out of time.

LISTEN TO TODAY’S SELECTION – Wednesday 12 December 

Out of Time

 You don’t know what’s going on

You’ve been away for far too long

You can’t come back and think you are still mine

You’re out of touch my baby

My poor discarded baby

I said, baby, baby, baby, you’re out of time

Well, baby, baby, baby, you’re out of time

I said, baby, baby, baby, you’re out of time

You are all left out

Out of there without a doubt

‘Cause baby, baby, baby, you’re out of time

 The girl that wants to run away

Discovers that she’s out of day

It’s no good you’re thinking that you are still mine

You’re out of touch, my baby

My poor unfaithful baby

I said, baby, baby, baby, you’re out of time

 Well, baby, baby, baby, you’re out of time

I said, baby, baby, baby, you’re out of time

Yes, you’re all left out

Out of there, without a doubt

‘Cause baby, baby, baby, you’re out of time

 You thought you were a clever girl

Giving up your social whirl

But you can’t come back and be the first in line,

oh no

You’re obsolete my baby

My poor old-fashioned baby

I said baby, baby, baby you’re out of time

 Well, baby, baby, baby, you’re out of time

I said, baby, baby, baby, you’re out of time

Yes, you’re left out

Out of there, without a doubt

‘Cause baby, baby, baby, you’re out of time

Sing the song….

I said, baby, baby, you’re out of time

 

 

 

That is what my youth was for

Yes, of course she performed the song on Sesame Street, adding that working with the Muppets was a career highlight.

Born in in Nova Scotia in 1976, but with a truly western upraising in Alberta and Saskatchewan, singer/musician/songwriter Leslie Feist has used the stage name, Fesit, since launching her solo career in 1999.  A poster child for the Indie pop and folk scene, it was her third album in 2007, “The Reminder” that sold over a million copies and earned her international recognition, mainly on the strength of this song that was co-written by the Australian singer-songwriter whose band opened for her during a cross-Canada tour.  

 LISTEN TO TODAY’S SELECTION – Tuesday 11 December

“After meeting Feist, I started to wonder whether she might like to do a cover of “1234 (One, Two, Three, Four),” recalled Sally Seltmann of New Buffalo, “but I was too shy to tell her about it. At the [final show] I plucked up the courage to tell her that I had written a song, which I thought she might like to use. We went onto the tour bus, and I recorded a simple version…into her laptop, with guitar and vocals. To my surprise, she loved the song, and started playing it live.”

With lyrics that differed from Seltmann’s original, Feist’s commercial version was digitally released as a single through iTunes, becoming an instant hit after it was used in an iPod nano commercial.  Reaching Number 8 on the Billboard Charts and Number 8 in the UK, it was a rare feat for an indie rock musician, especially as its sales were based on downloads alone.

The Sesame Street appearance occurred the following year and not only did Feist perform a special version of “1234” to help preschoolers learn to count, she also got to sing with Elmo later in the episode.

1234 (One, Two, Three, Four)

 One, two, three, four

Tell me that you love me more

Sleepless long nights

That is what my youth was for

Old teenage hopes are alive at your door

Left you with nothing but they want some more

 Oh, you’re changing your heart

Oh, You know who you are

 Sweetheart bitter heart now I can’t tell you apart

Cozy and cold, put the horse before the cart

Those teenage hopes who have tears in their eyes

Too scared to own up to one little lie

 Oh, you’re changing your heart

Oh, you know who you are

 One, two, three, four, five, six, nine, or ten

Money can’t buy you back the love that you had then

One, two, three, four, five, six, nine, or ten

Money can’t buy you back the love that you had then

 Oh, you’re changing your heart

Oh, you know who you are

Oh, you’re changing your heart

Oh, you know who you are

Oh, who you are

 For the teenage boys

They’re breaking your heart

For the teenage boys

They’re breaking your heart

Whoa, I heard it just then

In ’67 she became a Cliffie, entering Radcliffe College to major in Social Relations and African Studies. “I wanted to help undo the damage that Western colonialism had done to native cultures around the world,” she later said. “Cambridge was a hotbed of this kind of thinking, and I was thrilled.”

Born in Burbank, California in 1949 but mainly raised outside of New York City, where her father, John was a Broadway musical star, Bonnie Lynn Raitt discovered the guitar at an early age, picking up the bottleneck-style playing that would bring her fame while at summer camp in the Adirondacks.

Among so much else, the 1960s brought a Blues revival and Raitt learned that an important figure in that movement, promoter Dick Waterman, was a Harvard Square regular.  The two became friends and soon she was playing along-side the likes of Howlin’ Wolf, Sippie Wallace and Mississippi Fred McDowell  “…much to the chagrin of my parents, who didn’t expect their freshman daughter to be running around with 65-year-old bluesmen,” she recalled.

When Waterman moved to Philadelphia the following year, bringing the core of the local Blues community with him, Raitt decided to take a hiatus, later recounting how “…these people had become my friends, my mentors, and though I had every intention of graduating, I decided to take the semester off and move to Philadelphia…. It was an opportunity that young white girls just don’t get, and as it turns out, an opportunity that changed everything.”

Perhaps better known now for her ‘90s recordings, Bonnie Raitt released a number of acclaimed albums throughout the ’70s that incorporated elements of Blues, Folk and Country, including her 1973 album “Takin’ My Time”  that was produced by Lowell George of Little Feat fame.

One of the record’s more lively tracks is today’s selection. Originally a hit for The Sensations in 1962, “Let Me In” with music and lyrics by Yvonne Baker, expresses sentiments well suited to this social season.

LISTEN TO TODAY’S SELECTION – Monday 10 December 

Let Me In

 Let me in

Wee-ooh, wee-ooh, woo-wee-ooh

Wee-ooh, wee-ooh, woo-wee-ooh

I can see the dancin’

The silhouettes on the shade

I hear the music, all the lovers on parade

Open up, I want to come in again

I thought you were my friend

Pitter and patter on the feet

Movin’ and a groovin’ with that beat

Jumpin’ and stompin’ on the floor

Let me in, open up

Why don’t you open up that door?

I hear music let me in

Whoa I heard it just then

Let me in, I wanna’ come in again

I thought you were my friend

Wee-ooh, wee-ooh, woo-wee-ooh

Wee-ooh, wee-ooh, woo-wee-ooh

Pitter and patter on the feet

Movin’ and a groovin’ with that beat

Jumpin’ and stompin’ on the floor

Let me in, open up

Why don’t you open up that door?

I hear music let me in

I wanna’ come in again

Let me in, Whoa I heard it just then

I thought you were my friend

Wee-ooh, wee-ooh, woo-wee-ooh

Wee-ooh, wee-ooh, woo-wee-ooh

 Alright, I’m in.